Cover image for Archaeology, Bible, Politics, and the Media: Proceedings of the Duke University Conference, April 23-24, 2009 Edited by Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

Archaeology, Bible, Politics, and the Media

Proceedings of the Duke University Conference, April 23-24, 2009

Edited by Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

BUY

$49.50 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-237-2

6" × 9"

Duke Judaic Studies

Archaeology, Bible, Politics, and the Media

Proceedings of the Duke University Conference, April 23-24, 2009

Edited by Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

Archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible are prominent in the public square. Even archaeological controversies normally confined to the pages of obscure journals are considered newsworthy when they touch on biblical themes, people, or places. However, scholars are not always equipped to handle this sort of attention. Thus, the conference published in this book was organized to bring scholars into conversation with representatives of the media and to help them become better prepared to address the general public. Participants included the print media and the visual media as well as academics. The relation between archaeological controversies and Middle East politics emerged as a fraught subject in several essays, with the situation of the City of David in Jerusalem as a case in point. Other essays consider looting in Iraq and in other regions in the Middle East and highlight the legal and moral issues involved—for when legal norms recognized in international law and archaeological standards are violated, chaos reigns.

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
Archaeological discoveries relating to the Bible are prominent in the public square. Even archaeological controversies normally confined to the pages of obscure journals are considered newsworthy when they touch on biblical themes, people, or places. However, scholars are not always equipped to handle this sort of attention. Thus, the conference published in this book was organized to bring scholars into conversation with representatives of the media and to help them become better prepared to address the general public. Participants included the print media and the visual media as well as academics. The relation between archaeological controversies and Middle East politics emerged as a fraught subject in several essays, with the situation of the City of David in Jerusalem as a case in point. Other essays consider looting in Iraq and in other regions in the Middle East and highlight the legal and moral issues involved—for when legal norms recognized in international law and archaeological standards are violated, chaos reigns.

This volume opens a dialogue between scholars and the media, providing both with perspectives that will enable them to become better at communicating what they do to a wide audience. And it offers lay communities who learn about archaeology and the Bible through the popular media information that will make them more sensitive to the way discoveries and issues are presented.

List of Contributors

Introduction

Eric M. Meyers and Carol Meyers

Part 1: Cultural Heritage

The Media and Archaeological Preservation in Iraq: A Tale of Politics, Media, and the Law Patty Gerstenblith

Part 2: Archaeology and the Media

Fabulous Finds or Fantastic Forgeries? The Distortion of Archaeology by the Media and Pseudoarchaeologists and What We Can Do About It Eric H. Cline

Dealing with the Media: Response to Eric H. Cline Joe Zias

The Talpiyot Tomb and the Bloggers Mark Goodacre

From Ossuary Epigraphs to Flickering Pixels: A Response to Mark Goodacre A. K. M. Adam

The Power of the Press: The Effects of Press Releases and Popular Magazines on the Antiquities Trade Morag M. Kersel

History and Fiction: Comments on Morag M. Kersel’s “The Power of the Press” Annabel Wharton

Confessions of an Archaeologist: Lessons I Learned from the Talpiyot Tomb Fiasco and Other Media Encounters Jodi Magness

Popular Media, History, and the Classroom Chad Spigel

Scholars Behaving Badly: Sensationalism and Archaeology in the Media Byron R. McCane

The Future of the Historical Documentary: Scholarly Responses to “History Channel Meets CSI” Milton Moreland

An Ancient Medium in the Modern Media: Sagas of Semitic Inscriptions Christopher A. Rollston

Part 3: Archaeology, Politics, and Local Communities

Walk about Jerusalem: Protestant Pilgrims and the Holy Land Tony W. Cartledge

Community and Antiquities at Umm el-Jimal and Silwan: A Comparison Bert de Vries

Response to Bert de Vries, “Site Preservation in Jordan: The Case of Umm el-Jimal” S. Thomas Parker

Archaeology, Identity, and the Media in Cyprus Thomas W. Davis

Response to Thomas W. Davis, “Archaeology, Identity, and the Media in Cyprus” Donald C. Haggis

The Quest for the Temple Mount: The Settler Movement and National Parks in Israel Eric M. Meyers

On Tourism and Politics in Israel: A Response to Eric Meyers Rebecca L. Stein

Part 4: Voices of the Media

Responses from a Television Producer Ray Bruce

Areas of Concern as We Go Forward Moira Bucciarelli

Scholars at the Limits of Science and the Borders of Belief: Finding Proof for Faith. A Journalist’s Perspective on the Oded Golan Case Nina Burleigh

Not Another Roadside Attraction: The Holy Land Experience in America Mark I. Pinsky

Part 5: The Media: A View from Jerusalem

How It Looks from the Other Side Ethan Bronner

Index of Personal Names

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