Cover image for Sepphoris I: The Pottery from Ancient Sepphoris Edited by Marva Balouka, Anna De Vincenz, and Eric M. Meyers

Sepphoris I

The Pottery from Ancient Sepphoris

Marva Balouka, Anna De Vincenz, and Edited by Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

BUY

$59.50 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-269-3

8.5" × 11"

Sepphoris Excavation Reports

Sepphoris I

The Pottery from Ancient Sepphoris

Marva Balouka, Anna De Vincenz, and Edited by Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

Sepphoris, “the ornament of all Galilee” according to Josephus, was an important Galilean site during the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine periods and into early Islamic times. It served as Herod Antipas’s capital of Galilee in the late first century B.C.E. and the early first century C.E., and the Sanhedrin (the supreme Jewish judicial authority) was located there for a time in the third century C.E. Extensive excavations on the western acropolis—probably the location of many of the Jewish occupants of this multicultural city—by the Duke University-Hebrew University project in the mid- to late 1980s and the Duke excavations of the 1990s produced a remarkable assemblage of ceramic wares.

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
Sepphoris, “the ornament of all Galilee” according to Josephus, was an important Galilean site during the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine periods and into early Islamic times. It served as Herod Antipas’s capital of Galilee in the late first century B.C.E. and the early first century C.E., and the Sanhedrin (the supreme Jewish judicial authority) was located there for a time in the third century C.E. Extensive excavations on the western acropolis—probably the location of many of the Jewish occupants of this multicultural city—by the Duke University-Hebrew University project in the mid- to late 1980s and the Duke excavations of the 1990s produced a remarkable assemblage of ceramic wares.

This book provides an overview of the history and chronology of the site. It then presents a detailed examination of the pottery. Featuring 55 plates with line-drawings as well as some photos of the various ceramic types, this important publication will be essential for all studies of the archaeology of early Judaism and Christianity in the Holy Land.

List of Illustrations

Chapter 1. Introduction

Eric M. Meyers and Carol L. Meyers

1. Description of This Volume

2. History of Occupation; Chronology

The Persian Period: 5th–4th Centuries B.C.E

The Late Hellenistic Period: Second to First Centuries B.C.E

The Roman Period: First to Fourth Centuries C.E. (363)

The Byzantine–Early Islamic Period: Late Fourth (post-363) to Seventh Century C.E

3. Notes for the Reader

Chronological Designations on the Plates

Editors’ Comments

Chapter 2. Roman Pottery

Marva Balouka

1. Historical Background

2. The Roman Pottery of Sepphoris

3. Typology

Cooking Wares

Closed Cooking Pots (CP)

Small Cooking Pots (SCP)

Open Cooking Pots (Casseroles) (OCP)

Open Cooking Pot Lid (CPL)

Galilean Bowls (GB)

Small Cooking Jars (SCJ)

Cooking Jugs (CJG)

Storage Jars (SJ)

Hellenistic–Early Roman Storage Jars (HSJ)

Roman Storage Jars (SJ)

Pithos

Amphorae

Pouring Vessels

Amphoriskoi (AMP)

Jugs (JG)

Juglets (?JT)

Kraters, Basins, Mortaria, and Locally Made Bowls and Cups

Kraters (KR)

Basins (BS)

Mortaria

Locally Made Bowls (BL) and Cups

Imported Red-Slip Bowls

Eastern Terra Sigillata (ETS)

Late Roman Red-Slip Ware

African Red-Slip Ware (ARSW)

Cypriot Red-Slip Ware (LATE ROMAN ‘D’W)

Varia

Lids

Miscellanea

Ceramic Incense Shovels and Pateras

Incense Shovels

Pateras

Incense Shovel and Patera Lids

Discussion

Chapter 3. Additional Roman Pottery

Eric M. Meyers

1. Early Roman–Middle Roman Period

2. Late Hellenistic–Middle Roman Period

3. Middle Roman-Late Roman Period

4. Late Hellenistic-Middle Roman Period

Chapter 4. Fine Wares; Byzantine–Early Islamic Wares

Anna de Vincenz

1. Eastern Sigillata A Wares and Other Hellenistic and Early Roman Fine Wares (pls–42)

Introduction

Eastern Sigillata A Wares (pl)

Other Imported Fine Wares (pl. 42)

Conclusion

2. Byzantine–Early Islamic Pottery Assemblage from the Byzantine Shops (pls–51)

Introduction

The Pottery

Conclusion

3. Additional Byzantine and Early Islamic Pottery from Various Loci and from Cistern 85.1195 and Locus 85.4120 (pls–54)

Introduction

Pottery from Various Loci (pl. 52)

Vessels from Cistern 85.1195 (pl. 53)

Vessels from Locus 84.4120 (pl. 54)

4. Additional Late Roman–Byzantine Fine Wares from Various Loci (pls–57)

Introduction

African Red-Slip Bowls and Plates (pl. 55)

Cypriot Red-Slip Bowls and Plates (pl. 56)

Late Roman C, Egyptian Red-Slip, and

Other Fine Wares (pl. 57)

Conclusions

5. Comments on Sherds with Incised or Painted Menorahs by Carol L. Meyers

Description

Discussion

Bibliography

Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list and be notified about new titles, journals and catalogs.