Cover image for Reconstructing Jerusalem: Persian Period Prophetic Perspectives By Kenneth Ristau

Reconstructing Jerusalem

Persian Period Prophetic Perspectives

Kenneth Ristau

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$64.50 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-408-6

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Reconstructing Jerusalem

Persian Period Prophetic Perspectives

Kenneth Ristau

Jerusalem—one of the most contested sites in the world. Reconstructing Jerusalem takes readers back to a pivotal moment in its history when it lay ruined and abandoned and the glory of its ancient kings, David and Solomon, had faded. Why did this city not share the same fate as so many other conquered cities, destroyed and forever abandoned, never to be rebuilt? Why did Jerusalem, disgraced and humiliated, not suffer the fate of Babylon, Nineveh, or Persepolis? Reconstructing Jerusalem explores the interrelationship of the physical and intellectual processes leading to Jerusalem’s restoration after its destruction in 587 B.C.E., stressing its symbolic importance and the power of the prophetic perspective in the preservation of the Judean nation and the critical transition from Yahwism to Judaism. Through texts and artifacts, including a unique, comprehensive investigation of the archaeological evidence, a startling story emerges: the visions of a small group of prophets not only inspired the rebuilding of a desolate city but also of a dispersed people. Archaeological, historical, and literary analysis converge to reveal the powerful elements of the story, a story of dispersion and destruction but also of re-creation and revitalization, a story about how compelling visions can change the fate of a people and the course of human history, a story of a community reborn to a barren city.

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
Jerusalem—one of the most contested sites in the world. Reconstructing Jerusalem takes readers back to a pivotal moment in its history when it lay ruined and abandoned and the glory of its ancient kings, David and Solomon, had faded. Why did this city not share the same fate as so many other conquered cities, destroyed and forever abandoned, never to be rebuilt? Why did Jerusalem, disgraced and humiliated, not suffer the fate of Babylon, Nineveh, or Persepolis? Reconstructing Jerusalem explores the interrelationship of the physical and intellectual processes leading to Jerusalem’s restoration after its destruction in 587 B.C.E., stressing its symbolic importance and the power of the prophetic perspective in the preservation of the Judean nation and the critical transition from Yahwism to Judaism. Through texts and artifacts, including a unique, comprehensive investigation of the archaeological evidence, a startling story emerges: the visions of a small group of prophets not only inspired the rebuilding of a desolate city but also of a dispersed people. Archaeological, historical, and literary analysis converge to reveal the powerful elements of the story, a story of dispersion and destruction but also of re-creation and revitalization, a story about how compelling visions can change the fate of a people and the course of human history, a story of a community reborn to a barren city.

Abbreviations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Reconstructing Jerusalem: Outline, Method, Scope

The Rise and Fall of State Ideology in Judah

Problems in Post-collapse Judean Society

"No Houses Had Been Built": The Archaeology of Persian-Period Jerusalem

The Settlement

Fortifications

Epigraphic Evidence

Burial Site and Significant Material Remains

Interpretations and Regional Context

Recreating Jerusalem: The Isaianic Perspective(s)

Reconstruction in Deutero-Isaiah

Reconstruction in Trito-Isaiah

Conclusions

Revitalizing Jerusalem: The Perspective of Haggai

The Date and Organization of the Work

The Temporal Frame and Sitz-im-Leben

The Nature of the Restoration

Reconstruction as a Covenant Imperative

The Temple as Bourse

Zerubbabel as Hoffnungsträger for the Temple's Reconstruction

Conclusions

Reconsecrating Jerusalem: The Perspective of Zechariah 1–8

The Composition of the Text

The Temple and the Community in the Divine Combat Cycle

Conclusions

Reforming Jerusalem: Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives from Zechariah 9–14 and Malachi

The Explicit and Implied Imperial and Regional Context(s)

Persians and Edomites in Malachi

Judean Leadership and the Community

The Status of the City and the Temple

Conclusions

Conclusion: From Cult to Culture

The Two Dimensions

Conclusion

Bibliography

Index of Authors

Index of Scripture

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