Cover image for The Economy of Ancient Judah in Its Historical Context Edited by Marvin Miller, Ehud Ben Zvi, and Edited byGary N. Knoppers

The Economy of Ancient Judah in Its Historical Context

Edited by Marvin Miller, Edited by Ehud Ben Zvi, and Edited by Gary N. Knoppers

BUY

$49.50 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-413-0

6" × 9"

The Economy of Ancient Judah in Its Historical Context

Edited by Marvin Miller, Edited by Ehud Ben Zvi, and Edited by Gary N. Knoppers

The dynamics of ancient Judah’s economy are among the most important, but also neglected and least understood, aspects of ancient Israel’s history. The essays in this volume address this gap from a multidisciplinary perspective, involving archeology, biblical studies, economics, epigraphy, ancient history, Jewish studies, and theology. The essays focus on particular issues in the economy of ancient Judah and its neighbors during the late monarchy and the Neo-Babylonian, Persian, and Hellenistic periods. Some of them evaluate the theoretical models used to understand the inner workings of ancient agrarian economies, while others explore rural economies, the forces of regeneration and degeneration in particular regions, the settlement histories of different areas, and the exploitation of depopulated land in Judah and Idumea. Essays in the volume also address population growth, urbanization, the role of diverse temple towns (such as Babylon and Jerusalem) in regional market economies, the literary portrayal of patron–client relationships, symmetrical and asymmetrical relations in international trade, and the views of urban elites toward agrarian economic developments. Yet others discuss family economics—policies of reproduction, gender roles, family size, and household hierarchies—in Judah and ancient Persia. Many of the essays appearing in this volume were originally delivered as papers in special sessions devoted to these topics at annual meetings of the Canadian Society of Biblical Studies and the European Association of Biblical Studies. The scholars participating in this international project conduct their research at institutions in Canada, Germany, Israel, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United States.

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
The dynamics of ancient Judah’s economy are among the most important, but also neglected and least understood, aspects of ancient Israel’s history. The essays in this volume address this gap from a multidisciplinary perspective, involving archeology, biblical studies, economics, epigraphy, ancient history, Jewish studies, and theology. The essays focus on particular issues in the economy of ancient Judah and its neighbors during the late monarchy and the Neo-Babylonian, Persian, and Hellenistic periods. Some of them evaluate the theoretical models used to understand the inner workings of ancient agrarian economies, while others explore rural economies, the forces of regeneration and degeneration in particular regions, the settlement histories of different areas, and the exploitation of depopulated land in Judah and Idumea. Essays in the volume also address population growth, urbanization, the role of diverse temple towns (such as Babylon and Jerusalem) in regional market economies, the literary portrayal of patron–client relationships, symmetrical and asymmetrical relations in international trade, and the views of urban elites toward agrarian economic developments. Yet others discuss family economics—policies of reproduction, gender roles, family size, and household hierarchies—in Judah and ancient Persia. Many of the essays appearing in this volume were originally delivered as papers in special sessions devoted to these topics at annual meetings of the Canadian Society of Biblical Studies and the European Association of Biblical Studies. The scholars participating in this international project conduct their research at institutions in Canada, Germany, Israel, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United States.

Preface

Abbreviations

Part 1: Introduction

Cultivating Curiosity: Methods and Models for Understanding Ancient Economies

Marvin Lloyd Miller

Part 2: Economic Indications from the Hebrew Bible

The “Successful, Wise, Worthy Wife” of Prov 31:10–31 as a Source for Reconstructing Aspects of Thought and Economy in the Late Persian / Early Hellenistic Period

Ehud Ben Zvi

More than Friends? The Economic Relationship between Huram and Solomon Reconsidered

Gary N. Knoppers

Agrarian Economy through City-Elites’ Eyes: Reflections of Late Persian Period Yehud Economy in the Genealogies of Chronicles

Louis Jonker

Ancient Comparisons, Modern Models, and Ezra–Nehemiah: Triangulating the Sources for Insights on the Economy of Persian Period Yehud

Peter Altmann

Part 3: Economic Indications from Other Literary Sources: פ.רו. ו.ר.בו. and the Seventh Year: Complementary Strategies for the Economic Recovery of Depopulated Yehud

Philippe Guillaume

Exploitation of Depopulated Land in Achaemenid Judah

Lisbeth S. Fried

The Achaemenid Policy of Reproduction

Josef Wiesehöfer

The Economy and Administration of Rural Idumea at the End of the Persian Period

Diana Edelman

Part 4: Economic Indications from Archaeology

Forces of Decline and Regeneration: A Socioeconomic Account of the Iron Age II Negev Desert

Yifat Thareani

The Rural Economy of Judah during the Persian Period and the Settlement History of the District System

Oded Lipschits

Indexes

Index of Authors

Index of Scripture

Preface

Abbreviations

Part 1: Introduction

Cultivating Curiosity: Methods and Models for Understanding Ancient Economies

Marvin Lloyd Miller

Part 2: Economic Indications from the Hebrew Bible

The “Successful, Wise, Worthy Wife” of Prov 31:10–31 as a Source for Reconstructing Aspects of Thought and Economy in the Late Persian / Early Hellenistic Period

Ehud Ben Zvi

More than Friends? The Economic Relationship between Huram and Solomon Reconsidered

Gary N. Knoppers

Agrarian Economy through City-Elites’ Eyes: Reflections of Late Persian Period Yehud Economy in the Genealogies of Chronicles

Louis Jonker

Ancient Comparisons, Modern Models, and Ezra–Nehemiah: Triangulating the Sources for Insights on the Economy of Persian Period Yehud

Peter Altmann

Part 3: Economic Indications from Other Literary Sources: פ.רו. ו.ר.בו. and the Seventh Year: Complementary Strategies for the Economic Recovery of Depopulated Yehud

Philippe Guillaume

Exploitation of Depopulated Land in Achaemenid Judah

Lisbeth S. Fried

The Achaemenid Policy of Reproduction

Josef Wiesehöfer

The Economy and Administration of Rural Idumea at the End of the Persian Period

Diana Edelman

Part 4: Economic Indications from Archaeology

Forces of Decline and Regeneration: A Socioeconomic Account of the Iron Age II Negev Desert

Yifat Thareani

The Rural Economy of Judah during the Persian Period and the Settlement History of the District System

Oded Lipschits

Indexes

Index of Authors

Index of Scripture

The reading of this book marks an interesting step in the treatment of the question of the economy of Judah in its historical context, emphasizing that the approach of the traces left by the old economies must proceed by the construction of a grid of analysis which is developed on a case-by-case basis in dialogue with the documentation processed.—M. Bürki in Transeuphratène 48 (2016): 155–58

Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list and be notified about new titles, journals and catalogs.