Cover image for A Canonical Exegesis of the Eighth Psalm: YHWH's Maintenance of the Created Order through Divine Reversal By Hubert James Keener

A Canonical Exegesis of the Eighth Psalm

YHWH's Maintenance of the Created Order through Divine Reversal

Hubert James Keener

BUY

$37.95 | Paperback Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-708-7

234 pages
6" × 9"
2013

Journal of Theological Interpretation Supplements

A Canonical Exegesis of the Eighth Psalm

YHWH's Maintenance of the Created Order through Divine Reversal

Hubert James Keener

Since Brevard Childs first introduced it as a “fresh approach” in the late 1960s, canonical exegesis has grown into a widely discussed and developed program—virtually a “school” of biblical interpretation—with many scholars carrying forward an approach to theological exegesis that emphasizes the role of canon as the central context for interpretation of the Christian Scriptures. In this study, Keener takes a twofold approach: (1) he demonstrates that a canonical exegesis is tenable if the task is approached with clarity regarding its core theological foundation; and (2) he applies the approach to the interpretation of the often thorny questions surrounding the understanding of Psalm 8. This is useful in that Psalm 8 touches upon several questions germane to the successful implementation of canonical exegesis due to the many intertextual connections it shares with the rest of the Bible. Keener concludes that Psalm 8 in the Old Testament represents the intersection of two trajectories: (1) the reversal motif in which YHWH maintains the created order through the exaltation of the weak and the humble; and (2) the motif of the conflicted and conflicting human, in which humans are shown as beset by trials, often failing and even occupying the role of the enemies of YHWH. A third trajectory becomes visible in the context of the New Testament, that of the redeeming Christ; this third trajectory intersects with the two Old Testament trajectories and makes possible the redemption of conflicted humanity, giving the ultimate answer to the psalmist’s question, “What is the human?”

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
Since Brevard Childs first introduced it as a “fresh approach” in the late 1960s, canonical exegesis has grown into a widely discussed and developed program—virtually a “school” of biblical interpretation—with many scholars carrying forward an approach to theological exegesis that emphasizes the role of canon as the central context for interpretation of the Christian Scriptures. In this study, Keener takes a twofold approach: (1) he demonstrates that a canonical exegesis is tenable if the task is approached with clarity regarding its core theological foundation; and (2) he applies the approach to the interpretation of the often thorny questions surrounding the understanding of Psalm 8. This is useful in that Psalm 8 touches upon several questions germane to the successful implementation of canonical exegesis due to the many intertextual connections it shares with the rest of the Bible. Keener concludes that Psalm 8 in the Old Testament represents the intersection of two trajectories: (1) the reversal motif in which YHWH maintains the created order through the exaltation of the weak and the humble; and (2) the motif of the conflicted and conflicting human, in which humans are shown as beset by trials, often failing and even occupying the role of the enemies of YHWH. A third trajectory becomes visible in the context of the New Testament, that of the redeeming Christ; this third trajectory intersects with the two Old Testament trajectories and makes possible the redemption of conflicted humanity, giving the ultimate answer to the psalmist’s question, “What is the human?”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF FIGURES

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I. The Canon-Exegetical Approach

1. Introduction

2. A Survey of Literature on Canonical Exegesis

2.1 Brevard Childs

2.2 Barr and the Defense of “Biblical Criticism”

2.3 Mark Brett: The Case for a Pluralistic Approach

2.4 The Continuation of the Canonical Approach

3. The Canonical Approach in Dialogue with De Doctrina Christiana

3.1 The Hermeneutic of De Doctrina Christiana

3.2 De Doctrina Christiana and Canonical-Exegesis

4. Current Scholarship on Psalm 8

II. Reading Psalm Eight as a Discrete Unit

1. Reading the Eighth Psalm

1.1 Translation

1.2 Some Text-Critical and Translational Concerns

1.3 Date and Setting

1.4 Themes and Motifs

1.5 A Close Reading of Psalm 8

2. Tracing Trajectories for Canonical Exegesis

2.1 YHWH’s majestic name

2.2 The created order

2.3 The role of humanity

2.4 The reversal motif

3. Selecting Passages for Canonical Exegesis

III. Psalm 8 in the Context of the Psalter

1. Psalm 8 in the Context of Psalms 7-9/10

2. Psalm 8 in the Context of Psalms 1-14

3. Psalm 8 in the Context of Book One of the Psalter

4. Psalm 8 in the Context of the Entire Psalter

4.1 An Overview of the Shape of the Psalter

4.2 Psalm 8 and the Shape of the Psalter

5. Summary

6. Encountering the res and engendering caritas

IV. Psalm 8 in the Context of the Old Testament

1. The First Creation Account and Psalm 8

1.1 Reading Genesis 1:1-2:3 “In Itself”

1.2 Genesis 1 and Psalm 8

2. Reading Psalm 8 in Light of Job 7

2.1 Job 7:17-18

2.2 Job 7:17-18 and Psalm 8

3. Reading Psalm 8 in Light of Psalm 144

3.1 Reading Psalm 144:3-4 “in itself”

3.2 Psalm 144:3-4 and Psalm 8

4. Reversing the Dialectic: Reading the Old Testament in Light of Psalm 8; Encountering the res and engendering caritas

V. Psalm 8 and the New Testament

1. Matthew 21:14-17 and Psalm 8

1.1 Reading Matthew 21:14-17 “In Itself”

1.2 Reading Psalm 8 in Light of Matthew 21:1-17

2 Corinthians 15:25-28 and Psalm 8

2.1 Reading 1 Corinthians 15:25-28 “In Itself”

2.2 Reading Psalm 8 in Light of 1 Corinthians 15:27

3. Ephesians 1:15-22 and Psalm 8

3.1 Reading Ephesians 1:15-22 “In Itself”

3.2 Reading Psalm 8 in Light of Ephesians 1:19-23

4. Hebrews 2:5-9 and Psalm 8

4.1 Reading Hebrews 2:5-9 “In Itself”

4.2 Reading Psalm 8 in Light of Hebrews 2:5-18

5. Psalm 8 in Dialogue with the New Testament: Encountering the res and engendering caritas

VI. Summary and Conclusions

Bibliography

Index of Biblical Citations

Index of Authors and Subjects

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