Cover image for Ashkelon 7: The Iron Age I By Lawrence E. Stager, Daniel M. Master, and ByAdam J. Aja

Ashkelon 7

The Iron Age I

Lawrence E. Stager, Daniel M. Master, and Adam J. Aja

COMING IN

$159.95 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-64602-090-4
Coming in

1000 pages
8.5" × 11"
2020

Final Reports of The Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon

Ashkelon 7

The Iron Age I

Lawrence E. Stager, Daniel M. Master, and Adam J. Aja

The Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon continues its final report series with a study of the Iron Age I. Following the dramatic collapse of the Mediterranean world at the end of the Bronze Age, new groups emerged across the Levantine littoral. One of those groups was the Philistines, famous archenemies of the Israelites in the Hebrew Bible. This volume shows how Ashkelon became a Philistine city. The volume presents evidence for the arrival of a new group from the West that changed fundamental patterns of life. Ceramics shapes, architectural patterns, foodways, industrial technology, decorative traditions, and forms of writing are all explored in this volume, and each of these forms of evidence shows how the newly arrived Philistines first responded to the Levantine world around them. After settling in the seaport of Ashkelon, the Philistines continued to trade internationally, as was typical of earlier inhabitants of the city, and their ongoing maritime connections provide additional insight into the economy of the Mediterranean in the twelfth and eleventh centuries B.C. This volume represents the culmination of more than thirty years of archaeological research into questions of Philistine culture, bringing together research from more than thirty scholars covering all aspects of ancient life in Ashkelon during the Iron Age I.

 

  • Description
  • Bio
The Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon continues its final report series with a study of the Iron Age I. Following the dramatic collapse of the Mediterranean world at the end of the Bronze Age, new groups emerged across the Levantine littoral. One of those groups was the Philistines, famous archenemies of the Israelites in the Hebrew Bible. This volume shows how Ashkelon became a Philistine city. The volume presents evidence for the arrival of a new group from the West that changed fundamental patterns of life. Ceramics shapes, architectural patterns, foodways, industrial technology, decorative traditions, and forms of writing are all explored in this volume, and each of these forms of evidence shows how the newly arrived Philistines first responded to the Levantine world around them. After settling in the seaport of Ashkelon, the Philistines continued to trade internationally, as was typical of earlier inhabitants of the city, and their ongoing maritime connections provide additional insight into the economy of the Mediterranean in the twelfth and eleventh centuries B.C. This volume represents the culmination of more than thirty years of archaeological research into questions of Philistine culture, bringing together research from more than thirty scholars covering all aspects of ancient life in Ashkelon during the Iron Age I.

The volume spans more than 900 full-color pages with forty chapters. The architecture, stratigraphy, pottery, and other finds are presented in considerable detail, shedding new light on this important period in the history of ancient Ashkelon. It is an indispensable resource for scholars interested in the history of the eastern Mediterranean or the background of the Biblical world.

Lawrence E. Stager (1943–2017) was the inaugural Dorot Professor of the Archaeology of Israel at Harvard University and director of the Harvard Semitic Museum (1986–2012). He directed excavations at Idalion (Cyprus) and Carthage (Tunisia). From 1985–2016 he directed the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon. Among his books are the award-winning Life in Biblical Israel (with P.J. King) and Ashkelon Discovered: From Canaanites and Philistines to Romans and Moslems. In 2016 he received the Percia Schimmel Prize from the Israel Museum for his contributions to archaeology in Israel, and in 2018 the Israel Exploration Society published a volume of Eretz-Israel in his honor.

Daniel M. Master is Professor of Archaeology at Wheaton College and co-directed the work of the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon from 2007 to 2016. He currently oversees the publication of the Ashkelon final report series and is co-director of excavations at the site of Tel Shimron (Israel). His publications also include the first final report on the 1953–1964 excavations at Tel Dothan and (as general editor) The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology.

Adam J. Aja is Curator of Collections at the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East formerly the Harvard Semitic Museum) and chief stratigrapher at Tel Shimron Excavations. He served as grid supervisor and later as assistant director for the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon. He also worked for several seasons at the Tel Miqne-Ekron excavation and at Tel Tayinat in Turkey.