Cover image for Ur III Texts in the Schøyen Collection By Jacob L. Dahl

Ur III Texts in the Schøyen Collection

Jacob L. Dahl

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$150.00 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-57506-738-4

432 pages
8.5" × 11"
2020

CUSAS: Cornell University Studies in Assyriology and Sumerology

Ur III Texts in the Schøyen Collection

Jacob L. Dahl

Judging from the sheer amount of textual material left to us, the rulers of ancient Ur were above all else concerned with keeping track of their poorest subjects, who made up the majority of the population under their jurisdiction. Year after year, administrators recorded, in frightening detail, the whereabouts of the poorest individuals in monthly and yearly rosters, assigning tiny parcels of land to countless prebend holders and starvation rations to even more numerous estate slaves. The texts published in this volume—dating from the time of the Third Dynasty of Ur (ca. 2100–2000 BC)—attest to the immense investment of the ancient rulers in managing their subjects.

 

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Judging from the sheer amount of textual material left to us, the rulers of ancient Ur were above all else concerned with keeping track of their poorest subjects, who made up the majority of the population under their jurisdiction. Year after year, administrators recorded, in frightening detail, the whereabouts of the poorest individuals in monthly and yearly rosters, assigning tiny parcels of land to countless prebend holders and starvation rations to even more numerous estate slaves. The texts published in this volume—dating from the time of the Third Dynasty of Ur (ca. 2100–2000 BC)—attest to the immense investment of the ancient rulers in managing their subjects.

This volume presents editions of two hundred and twenty-four cuneiform tablets selected from the Schøyen Collection, the vast majority of which have not been previously published. The ancient provenience for these texts is primarily Umma, with other core provinces represented in smaller numbers, such as notable contributions from ancient Adab, which is underrepresented in the published record. In order to provide a fuller picture of the administration of the Ur III state, a number of texts from other collections, both published and unpublished, have been integrated into this volume. Accompanied by Jacob L. Dahl’s precise translations, extensive commentary, and exhaustive indexes, this volume presents extensive new data on prosopography, economy, accounting procedures, letters, contracts, technical terminology, and agriculture that adds significantly to our knowledge of society and the economy during the Third Dynasty of Ur.

An important contribution to the study of the Ur III period, in particular for Assyriology, this volume will serve as a useful handbook for scholars and students alike.

Jacob L. Dahl is Professor of Assyriology in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford.

Statement of Provenance, by Martin Schøyen

Series Editor’s Preface, by David I. Owen

Preface

Conventions

Abbreviations

Catalog

Concordances

1. Introduction

2. Archival Documents

Archival Tags (Nos. 1–5)

Sealed Tags with Inscriptions (No. 6)

Other Sealed Tags (Nos. 7–11)

Commodity Tags (Nos. 12–24)

3. Timekeeping (Nos. 25–27)

4. Accounts

Accounts Nos. 28–31

Structure of the Neo-Sumerian Account

“Debits” (sag-nig2-gur11-ra-kam) (Nos. 32–35)

“Credits” (ša3-bi-ta ... zi-ga-am3) (No. 36)

Operating Balance (No. 37)

Colophon

5. Equivalencies (Nos. 38–39)

6. Accountability (Nos. 40–42)

7. Receipts: The Primary Documents

Sealed Receipts (Nos. 43–61)

Receipts Mentioning a Conveyor (giri3) (Nos. 62–63)

Unsealed Receipts (Nos. 64–66)

Sealed Receipts with kišib3 PN (Nos. 67–79)

Receipts with Envelopes (Nos. 80–84)

Unsealed Receipts (Nos. 85–92)

Receipt Copies (Nos. 93–102)

mu-kux(DU) Documents (Nos. 103–9)

ba-zi and zi-ga Documents (Nos. 110–21)

i3-dab5 Documents (Nos. 122–23)

in-la2 Documents (No. 124)

8. Administration of Work

Inventories (Nos. 125–41)

Smaller Inventories (Nos. 142–47)

“Work-Crew Lists”

Receipts (Nos. 148–54)

Accounts (Nos. 155–58)

Miscellaneous Work Texts (Nos. 157-158)

9. Letters (Nos. 159–67)

10. Messenger Texts

Type I Messenger Texts (Nos. 168–89)

Type Isub Messenger Texts (Nos. 190–91)

Type II Messenger Texts (Nos. 192–94)

Type III Messenger Texts

Type IV Messenger Texts

11. Legal Texts

Purchase Documents (Nos. 196–98)

Loan Documents (Nos. 199–201)

Miscellaneous Legal Documents (Nos. 202–8)

12. Miscellaneous Texts

An Inventory of Date Palms (No. 209)

An Inventory of Fallen Cattle (No. 210)

An Inventory of the Treasury of Alim-mah (No. 211)

An Exercise Tablet? (No. 212)

The Volume of Ditches and Canals (No. 213)

A Field Plan without a Drawing (No. 214)

Bundles of Reeds for the Storehouse of the Edana (No. 215)

Two Exercises in Cereal Computations (Nos. 216–17)

A Discarded Exercise Tablet? (No. 218)

Animals for Gods (No. 219)

A Receipt without Context (No. 220)

A Receipt of Three Receipts? (No. 221)

Two Inventories of Unknown Purpose (Nos. 222–23)

Two Fragments Glued Together (No. 224a–b)

Offerings from the Governor (No. 225)

Not a Tag? (No. 226)

Two Notes or Exercise Tablets? (Nos. 227–28)

Receipts or Exercise Tablets? (Nos. 229–32)

A Broken Account of Foodstuffs (No. 233)

Two Broken Accounts (Nos. 234–35)

Two Texts Related to the Messenger Service? (Nos. 236–37)

Two Texts of Uncertain Content (Nos. 238–39)

A Very Broken Text (No. 240)

Not an Account? (No. 241)

Not a Letter? (No. 242)

Not a Regular Legal Text (No. 243)

A Damaged Garšana Text (No. 244)

Appendix. Transliterations of Long Texts from Chapter 8: Worker Inventories (Nos. 126–31, 133, 135, 138, 140) and Work-day Accounts (Nos. 155, 156)

Bibliography

Indexes

Personal Names

Divine Names and Names of Rulers

Cities, Villages, and Districts

Rivers and Canals

Fields

Threshing Floors

Month Names

Year Names

Sumerian and Akkadian Words

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