Cover image for CUSAS 29: A Late Old Babylonian Temple Archive from Abi-esuh: The Sequel By Kathleen Abraham and Karel Van Lerberghe

CUSAS 29

A Late Old Babylonian Temple Archive from Abi-esuh: The Sequel

Kathleen Abraham and Karel Van Lerberghe

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$90.00 | Hardcover Edition
ISBN: 978-1-93430-974-2

444 pages

CUSAS: Cornell University Studies in Assyriology and Sumerology

CUSAS 29

A Late Old Babylonian Temple Archive from Abi-esuh: The Sequel

Kathleen Abraham and Karel Van Lerberghe

CUSAS 29 (2017) contains a critical edition of 206 tablets from the Rosen Collection at Cornell University and come from the archive at Dur-Abieshuh on the Hammurabi-nuhush-nishi canal. The volume constitutes a continuation of the 89 texts published previously in CUSAS 8 (2009). The archive can now be dated to between the first years of the reign of Abieshuh and the final years of Samsuditana. While the material presented in CUSAS 8 revealed that Nippur, the sacred city of Enlil and the center of learning, was at least still partially inhabited in the late Old Babylonian period, this volume provides deeper insights into the social, economic, and military structures of the South at the end of this period and adds substantially to our knowledge of the history, geography, social and military institutions during the late Old Babylonian period, particularly in the region of middle and southern Babylonia.

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
CUSAS 29 (2017) contains a critical edition of 206 tablets from the Rosen Collection at Cornell University and come from the archive at Dur-Abieshuh on the Hammurabi-nuhush-nishi canal. The volume constitutes a continuation of the 89 texts published previously in CUSAS 8 (2009). The archive can now be dated to between the first years of the reign of Abieshuh and the final years of Samsuditana. While the material presented in CUSAS 8 revealed that Nippur, the sacred city of Enlil and the center of learning, was at least still partially inhabited in the late Old Babylonian period, this volume provides deeper insights into the social, economic, and military structures of the South at the end of this period and adds substantially to our knowledge of the history, geography, social and military institutions during the late Old Babylonian period, particularly in the region of middle and southern Babylonia.

Table of Contents:

Series Editor’s Preface

Acknowledgments

Bibliography

Concordance

Dimensions

Introduction

The Texts

Indexes

Personal Names

Professional Names

Places and People

Divine Names

Distinctive Buildings

Tablet Copies, Plates I–CCXXVIII

Photographs and Illustrations of Seal Impressions, Plates CCXXIX–CCLVI

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