Cover image for The Royal Inscriptions of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680-669 BC) By Erle Leichty

The Royal Inscriptions of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680-669 BC)

Erle Leichty

BUY

The Royal Inscriptions of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680-669 BC)

Erle Leichty

The Royal Inscription of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680–669 BC) is the inaugural volume of the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period Project. The volume provides reliable, up-to-date editions of all of the known royal inscriptions of Esarhaddon, a son of Sennacherib who ruled Assyria for twelve years (680–669 BC). Editions of 143 firmly identifiable texts (which mostly describe successful battles and the completion of building projects, all done ad maiorem gloriam deorum), 29 poorly preserved late Neo-Assyrian inscriptions that may be attributed to him, and 10 inscriptions commissioned by his mother Naqia (Zakutu) and his wife Esharra-hammat are included. To make this corpus more user-friendly to both specialist and laymen, each text edition (with its English translation) is supplied with a brief introduction containing general information, a catalogue containing basic information about all exemplars, a commentary containing further technical information and notes, and a comprehensive bibliography (arranged chronologically from earliest to latest).

 

  • Description
  • Table of Contents
The Royal Inscription of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680–669 BC) is the inaugural volume of the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period Project. The volume provides reliable, up-to-date editions of all of the known royal inscriptions of Esarhaddon, a son of Sennacherib who ruled Assyria for twelve years (680–669 BC). Editions of 143 firmly identifiable texts (which mostly describe successful battles and the completion of building projects, all done ad maiorem gloriam deorum), 29 poorly preserved late Neo-Assyrian inscriptions that may be attributed to him, and 10 inscriptions commissioned by his mother Naqia (Zakutu) and his wife Esharra-hammat are included. To make this corpus more user-friendly to both specialist and laymen, each text edition (with its English translation) is supplied with a brief introduction containing general information, a catalogue containing basic information about all exemplars, a commentary containing further technical information and notes, and a comprehensive bibliography (arranged chronologically from earliest to latest).

The volume also includes: (1) a general introduction to the reign of Esarhaddon, the corpus of inscriptions, previous studies, and dating and chronology; (2) translations of the relevant passages of three Mesopotamian chronicles; (3) 19 photographs of objects inscribed with texts of Esarhaddon; (4) indexes of museum and excavation numbers and selected publications; and (5) indexes of proper names (Personal Names; Geographic, Ethnic, and Tribal Names; Divine, Planet, and Star Names; Gate, Palace, Temple, and Wall Names; and Object Names). The book is accompanied by a CD-ROM containing transliterations of selected inscriptions arranged in a ‘musical score’ format.

The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP) series will present up-to-date editions of the royal inscriptions of a number of late Neo-Assyrian rulers, beginning with Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC). This new series is modeled on the publications of the now-defunct Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) series and will carry on where its RIMA (Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Assyrian Periods) publications ended. The project is under the direction of G. Frame (University of Pennsylvania) and is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

List of Figures

Foreword

Preface

Editorial Notes

Bibliographical Abbreviations

Other Abbreviations

Object Signatures

Introduction

I. Assyria

Nineveh

Prisms — Nos. 1–9

Cylinders — Nos. 10–18

Stone slabs — Nos. 19–22

Brick — No. 23

Game boards — No. 24

Stone vessels — Nos. 25–29

Clay tablets — Nos. 30–56

Aššur

Prisms — Nos. 57–58

Cylinders — No. 59

Stone tablet — No. 60

Stone blocks — Nos. 61–67

Stone door sockets — Nos. 68–69

Stone vessels — Nos. 70–73

Stone object — No. 74

Stone amulets — No. 75

Clay tablet — No. 76

Kalhu

Cylinders — Nos. 77–80

Stone slabs — Nos. 81–87

Bricks — Nos. 88–89

Cylinder seal impression — No. 90

Stone vessel — No. 91

Clay lump — No. 92

Tarbisu

Cylinder — No. 93

Stone slabs — Nos. 94–95

Bricks — No. 96

II. Anatolia and Syria-Palestine

Til Barsip steles — No. 97

Zinçirli stele — No. 98

Clay tablets (duplicating Zinçirli) — Nos. 99–101

Qaqun stele — No. 102

Nahr el-Kelb rock relief — No. 103

III. Babylonia

Babylon

Prisms — Nos. 104–112

Cylinder — No. 113

Stone monument — No. 114

Assyrian hieroglyphs — No. 115

Clay tablets — Nos. 116–117

Cylinder seal — No. 118

Bricks — Nos. 119–126

Borsippa

Cylinder — No. 127

Nippur

Cylinders — Nos. 128–130

Bricks — Nos. 131–132

Uruk

Cylinders — Nos. 133–136

Bricks — Nos. 137–139

IV. Miscellaneous Objects

Silver vessel — No. 140

Bronze animal — No. 141

Eyestone — No. 142

Stone cylinder — No. 143

V. Uncertain Texts

Prisms — Nos. 1001–1004

Cylinders — Nos. 1005–1006

Steles — Nos. 1007–1008

Brick — No. 1009

Clay tablets — Nos. 1010–1020

Stone object — No. 1021

Stone vessels — Nos. 1022–1029

Misidentified cylinder — No. 1030

VI. Royal Women

Ešarra-hammat inscriptions

Eyestone — No. 2001

Stone block — No. 2002

Naqi’a / Zakutu inscriptions

Prisms — No. 2003

Cylinder — No. 2004

Clay tablets — Nos. 2005–2006

Stone beads — Nos. 2007–2009

Bronze relief — No. 2010

Minor Variants and Comments

Index of Museum Numbers

Index of Excavation Numbers

Index of Names

Concordances of Selected Publications

Scores of Inscriptions

Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list and be notified about new titles, journals and catalogs.